Monthly Archives: January 2016

Spring 2016 Week 4 Seminar: Nivi Manchanda (Leiden): The Imperial Sociology of the Tribe in Afghanistan, 1850-2015

 

Nivi.M&C.Poster copy

Poster image: Rajkamal Kahlon

The Spring 2016 Week 4 Modern and Contemporary History Research Seminar is on Wednesday 3 February 2016, at 16:15h in Arts Lecture Room 4 (LR4).

It will be delivered by:

 Nivi Manchanda (Leiden)

All are welcome and there will be drinks afterwards!

This talk is part of seminar mini-series on “Nationalism, Identity and Community from Medieval Times to the Present”  jointly presented by The Birmingham Centre for the Study of the Middle Ages and the Centre for Modern and Contemporary History.

Abstract: The ‘tribe’ is a notion intimately related to the study of Afghanistan, used as a generic signifier for all things Afghan, it is through this notion that the co-constitution of coloniser and colonised is crystallised and foregrounded in Afghanistan. By tracing the way in which the term ‘tribe’ has been deployed in the Afghan context, the article performs two kinds of intellectual labour. First, by following the evolution of a concept from its use in the early nineteenth century to the literature on Afghanistan in the twenty-first century, wherein the ‘tribes’ seem to have acquired a newfound importance, it undertakes a genealogy or intellectual history of the term. The Afghan ‘tribes’ as an object of study, follow an interesting trajectory: initially likened to Scottish clans, they were soon seen as brave and loyal men but fundamentally different from their British interlocutors, to a ‘problem’ that needed to be managed and finally, as indispensable to a long-term “Afghan strategy”. And second, it endeavours to describe how that intellectual history is intimately connected to the exigencies of imperialism and the colonial politics of knowledge production.

 

 

Tagged , , ,
%d bloggers like this: